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Locomotive Works Gallery

Choose from 96 pictures in our Locomotive Works collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Swindon Works employees manouvering a wheel set by crane, c.1940 Featured Locomotive Works Image

Swindon Works employees manouvering a wheel set by crane, c.1940

In this photograph a female crane operator is working alongside two male colleagues, manoeuvring a locomotive wheel set into place. What is particularly interesting to note in this image is the large expanse of roof lights, which have been blacked out as a precaution against air raids. The windows were painted with a thick black paint in order to prevent light from the workshops highlighting the Works as a target for air strikes. This had the effect of turning previously light airy shops into dark, gloomy places to work

Nordenfelt anti-aircraft gun in V Shop, Swindon Works c.1915 Featured Locomotive Works Image

Nordenfelt anti-aircraft gun in V Shop, Swindon Works c.1915

This striking image shows a newly made 6 pdr Nordenfelt anti-aircraft gun complete with mounting platform and protective skirting. The manufacturing for all parts of the gun and surrounds was carried out in the Boiler (V) Shop. Some of the old equipment in V Shop was adapted for the deep boring of the gun barrels and breeches, but new machines were also purchased by Swindon Works for the specialised work. Due to the large amount of munitions work required for the war effort, a special arrangement was made for Swindon to purchase equipment and charge it to the Government account

© STEAM Museum of the GWR

U.S locomotive No. 1604 at Swindon Works in December 1942 Featured Locomotive Works Image

U.S locomotive No. 1604 at Swindon Works in December 1942

U.S locomotive, No. 1604 is photographed here at Swindon Works in December 1942. Many of the American engines that were shipped to Britain were actually on their way to service on the continent. However, during their stay in Britain the American engines were put into service on the country's railway networks. The difference between US and Great Western locomotives provided challenges for locomotive crews with the high sided tenders causing issues at coaling stages and the single boiler water gauge leading to several boiler explosions. In total, 174 U.S. 2-8-0 locomotives worked on GW routes, with engine No. 1604 working across the Western network from January 1943 until she was sent overseas in September 1944