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Workers at Swindon Works Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 70 pictures in our Workers at Swindon Works collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Swindon Works Tunnel Entrance, 1935 Featured Workers at Swindon Works Print

Swindon Works Tunnel Entrance, 1935

A sea of men can be seen leaving the Works, probably at lunchtime. This was the main entrance tunnel for the Works. The doors were promptly closed after each call for work. Anyone late to work could not get in and have to explain themselves to the gatehouse staff

© STEAM Museum of the GWR

1930s, 1935, Entrance, People, Swindon Works, Tunnel

Swindon Works Hooter Operator 1936 Featured Workers at Swindon Works Print

Swindon Works Hooter Operator 1936

The hooter was a set of steam whistles that called employees into work, and signalled the end of the working day. The operator sounded the hooter by turning a wheel that released steam at high pressure, and sounded through the whistles on top of the hooter house

© STEAM Museum of the GWR

1936, Employee, Hooter, Hooter House, Swindon Works, Whistle

Swindon Works Polishing Shop in 1914 Featured Workers at Swindon Works Print

Swindon Works Polishing Shop in 1914

A photograph taken on 7th August 1914 of the Polishing Shop in the Carriage and Wagon Works. French polishing was a skilled trade and from the 1870s women had proven themselves to be highly capable in this role. They were given their own women-only workshop and by the 1890s were officially termed French Polishers. This was equal to their male counterparts. In December 1916 a directive was sent out to convert part of the Polishing Shop for the manufacture of aeroplanes. Whether or not these women had a part to play in this we do not know, but they would have come in close proximity to this extraordinary sight

© STEAM Museum of the GWR