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Carriage and Wagon Works Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 81 pictures in our Carriage and Wagon Works collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


No 4 Shop, Carriage Body Shop, 1946 Featured Carriage and Wagon Works Print

No 4 Shop, Carriage Body Shop, 1946

These men are working hard helping to construct a Hawksworth coach body. Each piece of timber and frame had its own place and slotted in with exact precision

© STEAM Museum of the GWR

Carpenters, Carriage Works, Coach, Coach Building, Staff, Swindon, Swindon Works, Wood

No 18 Stamping Shop at Swindon Works in 1915 Featured Carriage and Wagon Works Print

No 18 Stamping Shop at Swindon Works in 1915

A view of No. 18 Stamping Shop from March 1915, showing the reverse of a stationary boiler. At the bottom left of the image are sheets of metal ready to be heated in the gas furnaces just above. Once heated, the sheet metal is removed to the steam hammers (seen here on the right) and stamped into dies to create components. Incidentally, in July 1915, the book Life in a Railway Factory was first published. It was written by Alfred Williams and was his account of life inside Swindon Works. Alfred worked as head Drop-Stamper in this shop for 20 years, until ill health forced him to leave factory life in September 1914

© STEAM Museum of the GWR

Brake Third coach No. 3307 converted into a mobile cleansing unit, 1941 Featured Carriage and Wagon Works Print

Brake Third coach No. 3307 converted into a mobile cleansing unit, 1941

The fear of gas attack was of paramount concern during World War II, as demonstrated by the mass issuing of gas masks prior to the outbreak of war in 1939. One of the responsibilities of the ARP services was to lead the decontamination and cleansing process in the event of such an attack. Mobile cleansing units were made available to the ARP service to clean people who had been exposed to gas attack, and in July 1941 the GWR converted Brake Third coach No. 3307 into an ARP Cleansing Unit for this purpose. The van was equipped with an air lock leading to an undressing room, showers, and further along the vehicle, a dressing room stocked with fresh clothing. As can be seen in this photograph, the windows were completely blacked out and they were also made to be blast proof. This was one of 47 such units converted by the major railway companies, which were stationed at strategic locations for immediate dispatch to any station or rail depot where they were needed